deutsch
deutsch
new
english
english
 
по-украінскії
по-украінскії
 
по-русский
по-русский
 
nederlands
nederlands
 
português
português
 
le français
français
 
español
español
 
italiano
italiano
 
türkçe
türkçe
 
 HOME    PROGRAM     DOWNLOADS     PARTY     CURRENT     MITGLIEDER     FORUM     SERVICE     KONTAKT     DATENSCHUTZ   
 Overview 
 
 Foreign Policy 
 Education Policy 
 Ethics and Morality 
 Domestic Policy 
 Judicial Policy 
 Cultural Policy 
 Social Policy 
 Environment and Animal Rights 
 Transport Policy 
 Economic Policy 
 

Education Policy

Education policy as it is presently practiced in Germany is far too focussed on the mediation of the sort of individual and quantifiable knowledge that can be looked up in books and other sources. In our present-day „information society“, however, this is exactly the sort of knowledge that least requires mediation, since it is readily available to all on the Internet, for example.
What a genuinely contemporary education programme would need to place its emphasis on would rather be the acquisition of a capacity to recognize connections, to identify problems, and to develop possible solutions to these latter. Steps must be taken to promote logical thinking and the extension of certain „handicraft“-style ways of handling problems to questions and issues lying outside of the immediately practical sphere. One basic principle must be stressed particularly strongly: education is a basic human right; it must be accessible, free of charge, to anyone and everyone, regardless of their economic or social status!
Steps must be taken to remedy those present shortcomings in the training of teachers which bring it about that precisely this basic and crucial principle tends not to be put into practice or even properly perceived.


Schools and What Is Taught in Them

Besides the mediation of knowledge, it is also the wider task of schools and teachers to make children and adolescents „fit“, in the most general sense, for the life that awaits them.

But much that is indispensable to this end is provided by schools today either not at all or only in very inadequate form. The learning that is lacking would include, for example, that bearing on how conflicts might be made manageable by being taken up into a cultural framework designed to just this end; that bearing on how to deal properly with one’s own aggressions as well as with those of others; the different ways of dealing with stress; constructive manners of dealing with setbacks; and, most especially, learning about what will tend to promote the development of a stable and autonomous personal identity.

We make a serious mistake in allowing ourselves the luxury of teaching either not at all (in the Gymnasium) or only in an inadequate manner, the most important of our investments in the future: the bringing-up of our children.

Where this bringing-up of our children is one consistently aimed at inculcating into them a behaviour conforming to the norm, this does, of course, appear prima facie to „make life easier“ first for the schools themselves and later for the firms that these children, once grown up, will work for, as well as for the state. This inasmuch as, so raised and educated, even the citizens of modern political democracies will tend to remain indistinguishable, in essence, from the manipulable and obedient „subjects“ of pre-modern states.

Considered in the long term, however, such conformist behaviour is rather totally counterproductive. Because for everyone to think in terms of the same cognitive patterns and models means that this thinking will never yield any new or different results. Only „lateral“, or other forms of unconventional and decidedly individual thinking can ever produce solutions which are innovative and open up genuine perspectives for the future.

In the end, it isn’t, after all, manipulable „subjects“ that our political community requires, but rather, indeed, genuine citizens capable of taking responsibility for their own thoughts, words, and deeds. But it is here that the difficulties really begin: if such is the case, it follows that the state must begin to understand its role as that of providing certain services for its citizens; those placed by us in positions of authority would then have to be themselves subject to constant supervision by those over whom they exercise said authority. This really would mean progress for Germany – but at the cost of changes that certain interests would find dismaying!



University Study and Adult Education

Education should not be looked at from the crude point of view of „what it costs“ but rather considered as an investment.

For this reason, universities must certainly be provided, in the most generous possible way, with the means to carry out their appointed task. Support from the private sector is, of course, not to be excluded here.

The emergence of „elites“ cannot be achieved by decree but is rather the spontaneous result of exceptional performance.

This is why the attempt of our present political leaders to bring into existence, artificially and overnight, certain „elite universities“ is doomed to failure from the very start.

A genuinely high standard of education, training and research can only be achieved on the basis of fair competition between the various institutes of higher education and, of course, on that of equally fair competition among prospective students for study places at the institutions which prove themselves indeed the best.