deutsch
deutsch
new
english
english
 
по-украінскії
по-украінскії
 
по-русский
по-русский
 
nederlands
nederlands
 
português
português
 
le français
français
 
español
español
 
italiano
italiano
 
türkçe
türkçe
 
 HOME    PROGRAM     DOWNLOADS     PARTY     CURRENT     MITGLIEDER     FORUM     SERVICE     KONTAKT     DATENSCHUTZ   
 Overview 
 
 Foreign Policy 
 Education Policy 
 Ethics and Morality 
 Domestic Policy 
 Judicial Policy 
 Cultural Policy 
 Social Policy 
 Environment and Animal Rights 
 Transport Policy 
 Economic Policy 
 

Ethics and Morality

Social Ethics

For quite some time now, it has been hard to overlook developments in our society which call seriously into question whether the course this society is presently taking is one that will lead us into any future worth aspiring to.
Bullying and harassment in the workplace; the steady decrease in neighbourly behaviour and in actions of simple human solidarity; the correlative increase in egoism; the diminishing faith that can realistically be placed in promises and solemn commitments; vandalism; and, last but not least, a rising suicide rate – all these, along with the unignorable increase in violent attitudes and behaviour, among children and adolescents as well as among other age-groups, are visible expressions of the fact that something is going seriously wrong.
Certain of the roots of this general negative trend in society are easy enough to identify: the lack, for many, of any sense of a future, or anxiety in the face of the future envisioned as most likely; the absence of positive role-models and the predominance of „value-systems“ which offer, in fact, no genuinely appropriate values.

Likewise, many will doubtless agree at least on the general outlines of possible solutions to this problem, namely:

  • The reduction of the level of pressure in our society, as, for example, through the removal, in favour of a greater degree of self-responsibility, of some of that burgeoning mass of rules, regulations and guidelines by which, increasingly, every sphere of our daily lives appears to be governed and directed

  • The provision of greater security by means of the introduction of a basic income belonging to each citizen by right

  • The creation of positive role-models by means of the realization of principles of honesty and decency, above all in the practices of leading figures in the political and business world

  • The taking of steps to preclude and prevent the development of such negative tendencies already in children, by means of the amendment of school curricula



Political Morality

Party officials, MPs, mayors and ministers, chancellors and, last but not least, civil servants constitute, as it were, the „management personnel“ of our state system. Whether by law or by special decree, a very significant degree of power has come to lie in the hands of this political „management class“. In this as in every case, of course, the rights accruing to those enjoying such power imply correlative obligations and duties. And we citizens have, for our part, a right (both in the sociological and the moral sense) to insist that these correlative duties be actually recognized and respected.

We have, that is to say, a right to demand of our political „management personnel“ not only that they possess, in the highest degree, the specific professional skills required for their work but also that they meet the very highest of moral standards by which the behaviour of individuals in a modern, enlightened society can be measured.

„Morality“ applied to the political sphere means: honestly, conformity to the law, awareness of duty and obligation (particularly of the politician’s or civil servant’s duty vis-à-vis the citizens), and fidelity to the specific content and conditions of the mandate given.

Far from, as has hitherto been the dominant practice, proceeding with special lenience in punishing the misdeeds of prominent individuals, we demand rather that the strictest and severest penalties be applied in such cases.

There is something especially reprehensible in such misdeeds as tax evasion, the according of illegitimate preferential treatment, bribery (be it as recipient or as the actual bribing party) dereliction of duty, and illegitimate self-enrichment, where these are practiced by individuals enjoying the position of role-models in our society.

The time has come for the all-too-familiar instances of such individuals’ making public statements which they themselves know to be false („pensions shall not be affected“) along with any activities which tend to condone and lend support to such conscious mendacity (such as the distortion or misrepresentation of statistics) to be recognized to constant serious statutary offences and to be pursued and punished accordingly.



Economic Morality

In contrast to political morality, morality and ethics as these apply in the sphere of economic life and activity present – at least prima facie – a more complex and differentiated aspect.

Whereas politicians have, in the last analysis, duties and obligations vis-à-vis their fellow citizens only and precisely qua citizens, incumbent on those enjoying power in the economic sphere are obligations vis-à-vis other persons under a whole series of different aspects, namely: vis-à-vis the population in their totality (e.g. in respect of damage to, or protection of the environment); vis-à-vis their employees (in respect of their jobs, their conditions of work, their wages); vis-à-vis their companies, and vis-à-vis their shareholders.

In fact, however, these different obligations stand, considered in the longer term, in no kind of contradictory relation to one another. It is only from the viewpoint of a short-sighted company policy that these different considerations take on the aspect of a „conflict of interests“. And such „conflicts of interests“ tend to loom larger and larger, the more short-term and shortsighted the manner of thinking about these questions becomes.